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The Friday Institute for Educational Innovation at NC State University, in collaboration with policymakers, education leaders, practitioners, business leaders and other partners from throughout the state, is developing the North Carolina Digital Learning Plan to continue and accelerate North Carolina’s progress. To learn more about the plan and view the latest policy briefs, please visit http://ncdlplan.fi.ncsu.edu Example of Recent Product(s) AEA...

The Friday Institute for Educational Innovation, with funding support from the Hewlett and Oak Foundations, is continuing its exploration of scalable approaches to professional development for educators through the development and evaluation of Massively Open Online Courses for Educators (MOOC-Eds). The purpose of this evaluation is to determine the efficacy and impact of the MOOC-Eds on educators’ knowledge and professional...

Headquartered in Chapel Hill, NC, VIF International Education (www.vifprogram.com) builds global education programs that prepare students for success in an interconnected world. For more than 25 years, educators have leveraged VIF’s professional development and curriculum, language acquisition, and teacher exchange programs to generate engaging learning environments where students can excel in core curriculum as well as develop valuable 21st century...

As part of a competitive grant competition run by Athabasca University (Principal Investigator: George Siemens), and funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the purpose of the MOOC Research Initiative was to advance understanding of the role of MOOCs in the education sector and how emerging models of learning will influence traditional education. This study leveraged the Friday Institute’s...

LoFTI is an observation tool for recording the extent of technology integration in a classroom environment. The data gathered through this instrument may be helpful to staff members planning and/or providing professional development in instructional technology.

The School Technology Needs Assessment (STNA, pronounced “Stenna”) is intended to help school-level decision makers—administrators, technology facilitators, media coordinators, or technology committee members— collect data to plan and improve uses of technology in teaching and learning activities.

The STNA-S collects information from students about the technology resources in their schools, how students and teachers use technology, students’ technology skills, and the benefits of technology use. More specifically, STNA-S is expected to uncover student perceptions of eight constructs: resource availability, infrastructure, technology support, teacher technology use, student technology use, student technology skills, impacts of technology, and development of...